#AllLivesDon'tMatterTheSame The Silent Epidemic Within Our Communities

I'd like to offer a moment, a moment of silence. Not only for the three teenagers that were killed execution style a few days ago but for the hundreds of individuals that are killed everyday because of racial, religious, cultural or any other kind of bias. Followed by a moment of anger, anger at the world for systematically operating in a way that does not allow for the growth of certain communities, and their easy executions. 

Photo Description: From left to right, three separate images of young men with their names, below.  "Adam K. Mekki" stands before the street with his body in full view. He faces the camera and is fully dressed for cold weather, hands in pockets. A home with two vehicles out of focus in the background.  "Muhannad A. Tairab" stands looking away from the photographer in slight amusement.  "Mohamedt aha Omar" smiles directly at the camera, leaning forward, with his hat back and at an angle.

Photo Description: From left to right, three separate images of young men with their names, below.  "Adam K. Mekki" stands before the street with his body in full view. He faces the camera and is fully dressed for cold weather, hands in pockets. A home with two vehicles out of focus in the background.  "Muhannad A. Tairab" stands looking away from the photographer in slight amusement.  "Mohamedt aha Omar" smiles directly at the camera, leaning forward, with his hat back and at an angle.

Yesterday, I woke up to the news of the murder of three Muslim Teenagers in Fort Wayne Indiana, found in an abandoned house murdered execution style. I won't post any pictures of the scene here or anything like that because frankly I myself would get triggered by seeing that kind of violence and I wouldn't wish that on anybody, but feel free to search for their story, if you can find it. So far, there has been very, very little media coverage into the story, something not shocking since they're Muslim. However, this case is hauntingly familiar to the Chapel Hill Shootings a little over a year ago, the reactions are entirely different. 

Photo Description: Two women stand center and right with a man in his red graduation cap and gown.  All three are wearing large smiles and you can see happiness in their eyes. It seems they are in a parking lot, post-graduation ceremony, with some trees, lights, signs, and cars in the background on a bright but cloudy day.

Photo Description: Two women stand center and right with a man in his red graduation cap and gown.  All three are wearing large smiles and you can see happiness in their eyes. It seems they are in a parking lot, post-graduation ceremony, with some trees, lights, signs, and cars in the background on a bright but cloudy day.

When the Chapel Hill Shootings happened the media was also silent, but social media exploded with Muslims demanding justice. There were campaigns, events, and everything else to make sure their stories were heard. That was the right response, to a terrible tragedy. But I remember thinking last year that had it been anyone else, three people that were less white and Americanized, they would not receive the same reaction. I remember thinking that with the understanding that I lie somewhere in between the spectrum, where I am white passing to an extent, and very Americanized, but I'm also not a citizen, and there's no justice if you're not American. But I understand my privilege.

Unfortunately, I was right. 

This time around when three Black Muslims are killed in a similar fashion there are no social media campaigns, no trending hashtags or anything like that. Yesterday morning, most of the articles I read barely even mentioned that they were Black. Then you read some comments and all of a sudden we're having a debate about gangs, drugs and many other things. Things that we never mentioned with the Chapel Hill Shooting. 

I'm not saying we need to take away some of the privilege from the Chapel Hill Victims, no... Right is right, and that reaction was right. But it's apparent that we as a community, both Muslim and Non-Muslim have a bias when it comes to minorities. The reality is very simple #AllLivesDONTMatter the same. We have seen this over and over again, by our communities responses, our media responses and even our individual responses. 

Photo Description: Two photographs, side-by-side.  On the right is a dark-skinned man with a look that seems to say he is used to this.  Serious, but almost bored.  In his hands is a sign "IS HIS LIFE WORTH MORE THAN MINE?" On the sign, there is an arrow pointing to the man on the left.  On the left is a light-skinned man with a look of anger and disgust.  He looks like he wants to hit something.  He also holds a sign "IS HIS LIFE WORTH LESS THAN MINE?" On the sign there is an arrow pointing to the right

Photo Description: Two photographs, side-by-side.  On the right is a dark-skinned man with a look that seems to say he is used to this.  Serious, but almost bored.  In his hands is a sign "IS HIS LIFE WORTH MORE THAN MINE?" On the sign, there is an arrow pointing to the man on the left.  On the left is a light-skinned man with a look of anger and disgust.  He looks like he wants to hit something.  He also holds a sign "IS HIS LIFE WORTH LESS THAN MINE?" On the sign there is an arrow pointing to the right

We're at the very end of #BlackHistoryMonth, unfortunately, these days it's hard to find places where #BlackHistoryMonth or #BlackLivesMatter really matter. 

So I offer that moment of anger, because despite what most people think anger is a great tool when used the right way. I offer it as a means of coming together and demanding justice not only for our three brothers, but for everyone that's suffering from these biases.  Let's demand Justice like we did with the Chapel Hill shooting for every injustice out there. 

T minus 27 Hours Before Black Lives Don't Matter as Much

Creatively Saving Lives and Living Them

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